Mushu’s Asian Pulled-Pork Sandwiches

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Mushu’s Asian Pulled-Pork Sandwiches

Guard this recipe with your life; your family will enjoy it for generations to come! The best part about making these sandwiches is shredding the pork—and little hands can do that just as easily as big ones!

 

From Dishing It Up Disney Style: A Cookbook for Families with Type 1 Diabetes

More Kid-Approved BBQ Recipes From Lilly Diabetes and Disney’s T1D Cookbook

Disney's Type 1 Diabetes Recipe Index

 

Makes 10 servings

What you'll need

  • 1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup hoisin sauce
  • 3 tablespoons ketchup
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons peeled and grated fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons dark sesame oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice powder
  • 4 pounds boneless Boston butt pork roast, trimmed of fat and cut into 2-inch chunks (you can substitute beef brisket)
  • 10 buns

How to make it

  1. Add everything but the meat and buns to the slow cooker and whisk to combine. Add the pork and toss it to coat. Cover and cook the meat on low for 8 hours.

  2. When the pork is done, remove it from the slow cooker with a slotted spoon and place it on a cutting board. Shred the pork by pulling the pieces apart with two forks.

  3. Return the meat to the cooker, stir it into the remaining sauce, and then serve it on the buns. If you like, make the dish up to 2 days ahead and store it covered in the refrigerator.

  4. Simply skim off any accumulated fat and reheat the meat in a saucepan over low heat before serving.

Nutritional Information

Serving size: 1 sandwich

Calories 508
Total Fat 21g
Total Carbohydrate 36g
Fiber 2g
Protein 42g
Carbohydrate Choice 2½




Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring.