Kim: Valentine's Day Snacks

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  • I love it!
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Oh great, it's Valentine's Day! I'm not worrying about getting roses or chocolate. I'm worried about all of the candy that gets passed out at school! To my great relief, though, the room moms do a fabulous job with providing some really healthy treats for the kids to enjoy! Some are so creative and cute, I just have to share them!

  1. Baby Carrot Hearts. Take two baby carrots and cut them at a diagonal with a sharp knife. (This is one that probably needs to be done by an adult.) Put them together in a V-shape with a dab of peanut butter or cream cheese, and it makes a really cute heart!
  2. Heart-shaped Strawberries. Cut a V-shape out of the top of a strawberry, including the stem. Then slice the strawberry in thin slices so each one looks like a heart.
  3. Cheese, Meat and Apple Slices. Cut cheese and lunch meat slices into 2-inch squares. Thinly slice apples into circle shapes (red apples work really well). Place the cheese, meat and apples on a large tray. Then allow each child to cut their own slices with a heart-shaped cookie cutter. Both the inside and the outside of the heart shape are really cute and can be stacked on a cracker.

I have to say that it just melts my heart (no Valentine's pun intended) when people go out of their way to accommodate Kaitlyn's medical needs. Even though most of the treats -- even the healthy ones -- require an insulin dose, it means so much that others care enough to do what they can to provide a fun and healthy experience that Kaitlyn can easily participate in.

 

About the author: My name is Kim. My daughter Kaitlyn (the third of our five children) was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes just a few years after my nephew James was diagnosed with the same disease. I'm excited to pair up with my sister-in-law, Jen, to share our story with you!
 

Disclaimer: The experiences and suggestions recounted in these articles are not intended as medical advice, and they are not necessarily the "typical" experiences of families with a child who has type 1 diabetes. These situations are unique to the families depicted. Families should check with their healthcare professionals regarding the treatment of type 1 diabetes and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring. Jen and Kim are real moms of kids with type 1 diabetes and have been compensated for their contributions to this site.

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